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Houston police say ‘sharp dressed man’ in hat and dark suit wanted in 2 bank robberies

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Houston police say ‘sharp dressed man’ in hat and dark suit wanted in 2 bank robberies

Houston police say they are looking for a “sharp dressed” man caught on camera robbing two separate banks in Houston, Texas this month…
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Russia to require basic military training in schools in ‘evocation of the Soviet Union,’ UK says

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Russia to require basic military training in schools in ‘evocation of the Soviet Union,’ UK says

Students throughout Russia will undergo basic military training starting next September, signaling a militarized atmosphere in wartime Russia, the UK Ministry of Defense said…
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New York pregnant woman dies after car driven by beau slams into electrical pole: police

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New York pregnant woman dies after car driven by beau slams into electrical pole: police

A Staten Island, New York pregnant woman died on Saturday morning after her beau, who was allegedly drunk, drove into an electrical pole, causing the vehicle to split in three…
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Eagles fans party in the streets, climb up greased poles after team’s NFC Championship win

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Eagles fans party in the streets, climb up greased poles after team’s NFC Championship win

Philadelphia Eagles fans partied hard following the team’s NFC Championship win over the San Francisco 49ers. The team is back in the Super Bowl…
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Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell poisoned the minds of American people: Devin Nunes

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Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell poisoned the minds of American people: Devin Nunes

Trump Media & Technology Group CEO Devin Nunes reacted to Speaker Kevin McCarthy blocking California Democrats Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell from the House Intel Committee…
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‘Quordle’ today: Here are the answers and hints for January 30

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‘Quordle’ today: Here are the answers and hints for January 30

A woman's hands holding a mobile phone playing 'Quordle'

Credit: Mike Pearl / Mashable

If Quordle is a little too challenging today, you’ve come to the right place for hints. There aren’t just hints here, but the whole Quordle solution. Scroll to the bottom of this page, and there it is. But are you sure you need all four answers? Maybe you just need a strategy guide. Either way, scroll down, and you’ll get what you need.

What is Quordle?

Quordle is a five-letter word guessing game similar to Wordle, except each guess applies letters to four words at the same time. You get nine guesses instead of six to correctly guess all four words. It looks like playing four Wordle games at the same time, and that is essentially what it is. But it’s not nearly as intimidating as it sounds.

Is Quordle harder than Wordle?

Yes, though not diabolically so.

Where did Quordle come from?

Amid the Wordle boom of late 2021 and early 2022, when everyone was learning to love free, in-browser, once-a-day word guessing games, creator Freddie Meyer says he took inspiration from one of the first big Wordle variations, Dordle — the one where you essentially play two Wordles at once. He took things up a notch, and released Quordle on January 30(Opens in a new window). Meyer’s creation was covered in The Guardian(Opens in a new window) six days later, and now, according to Meyer, it attracts millions of daily users. Today, Meyer earns modest revenue(Opens in a new window) from Patreon, where dedicated Quordle fans can donate to keep their favorite puzzle game running. 

How is Quordle pronounced?

“Kwordle.” It should rhyme with “Wordle,” and definitely should not be pronounced exactly like “curdle.”

Is Quordle strategy different from Wordle?

Yes and no.

Your starting strategy should be the same as with Wordle. In fact, if you have a favorite Wordle opening word, there’s no reason to change that here. We suggest something rich in vowels, featuring common letters like C, R, and N. But you do you.

After your first guess, however, you’ll notice things getting out of control if you play Quordle exactly like Wordle.

What should I do in Quordle that I don’t do in Wordle?

Solving a Wordle puzzle can famously come down to a series of single letter-change variations. If you’ve narrowed it down to “-IGHT,” you could guess “MIGHT” “NIGHT” “LIGHT” and “SIGHT” and one of those will probably be the solution — though this is also a famous way to end up losing in Wordle, particularly if you play on “hard mode.” In Quordle, however, this sort of single-letter winnowing is a deadly trap, and it hints at the important strategic difference between Wordle and Quordle: In Quordle, you can’t afford to waste guesses unless you’re eliminating as many letters as possible at all times. 

Guessing a completely random word that you already know isn’t the solution, just to eliminate three or four possible letters you haven’t tried yet, is thought of as a desperate, latch-ditch move in Wordle. In Quordle, however, it’s a normal part of the player’s strategic toolset.

Is there a way to get the answer faster?

In my experience Quordle can be a slow game, sometimes dragging out longer than it would take to play Wordle four times. But a sort of blunt-force guessing approach can speed things up. The following strategy also works with Wordle if you only want the solution, and don’t care about having the fewest possible guesses:

Try starting with a series of words that puts all the vowels (including Y) on the board, along with some other common letters. We’ve had good luck with the three words: “NOTES,” “ACRID,” and “LUMPY.” YouTuber DougMansLand(Opens in a new window) suggests four words: “CANOE,” “SKIRT,” “PLUMB,” and “FUDGY.”

Most of the alphabet is now eliminated, and you’ll only have the ability to make one or two wrong guesses if you use this strategy. But in most cases you’ll have all the information you need to guess the remaining words without any wrong guesses.

If strategy isn’t helping, and you’re still stumped, here are some hints:

Are there any double or triple letters in today’s Quordle words?

One word has a twice-occurring letter.

Are any rare letters being used in today’s Quordle like Q or Z?

No.

What do today’s Quordle words start with?

S, K, E, and A.

What are the answers for today’s Quordle?

Are you sure you want to know?

There’s still time to turn back.

OK, you asked for it. The answers are:

  1. GROUT

  2. SPURT

  3. TOWEL

  4. AGATE

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A lifetime subscription to this software training platform is on sale for 95% off

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A lifetime subscription to this software training platform is on sale for 95% off


Deal pricing and availability subject to change after time of publication.

TL;DR: A lifetime subscription to StreamSkill.com Software Training(Opens in a new window)(opens in a new tab) is on sale for £47.56, saving you 95% on list price.


Learning new software can be a challenge. Even ubiquitous software like Excel still can have a steep learning curve, and you may not always know if there’s a feature one dropdown menu away that could have been saving you hours. Though you could learn software through trial and error, you may be able to learn faster if you added some professional instruction.

StreamSkill has training courses for many common, in-demand apps like Photoshop, QuickBooks, and even coding languages like Python or HTML. Normally, an unlimited lifetime membership(Opens in a new window)(opens in a new tab) to StreamSkill would cost over £1,000. But you can get that unlimited lifetime membership for £47.56 for a limited time.

StreamSkill has over 110 courses across a wide variety of software, technical skills, and coding languages. Your unlimited membership would give you access to all of them, totaling over 6,500 individual lessons and 800+ hours of training. 

Those courses span a range of levels, and you can access more advanced titles when you’re ready. Courses include super popular software like Microsoft Office, and you may have used them before. However, if you’ve ever struggled to format a picture next to text in Word, you know there’s probably more out there to learn. 

You set the learning pace for each course. Watch and rewatch instructional videos while you practice. You probably won’t need to master every software StreamSkill has videos about, but if you start a new position and need to learn new programs, you could always check to see if there’s a professional tutorial for you to learn from. 

This is your chance to get lifetime access to a lon of great deals, including the entire StreamSkill catalog. Get an unlimited lifetime membership to StreamSkill.com Software Training(Opens in a new window)(opens in a new tab) for £47.56, with no code needed.

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‘The Boogeyman’ trailer brings closet monsters to life in Stephen King adaptation

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‘The Boogeyman’ trailer brings closet monsters to life in Stephen King adaptation

The official trailer for The Boogeyman has arrived, turning the imaginary monsters that hide in children’s closets into a not-so-imaginary threat.

Based on Stephen King‘s short story of the same name, supernatural horror The Boogeyman will follow two sisters (Vivien Lyra Blair and Sophie Thatcher) and their father (Chris Messina) as they grieve in the aftermath of their mother’s death. Unfortunately, this loss isn’t the only hardship they face, with a sinister supernatural creature also terrorising the small family.

The Boogeyman creeps into theatres June 2.

Amanda Yeo

Reporter

Amanda Yeo is Mashable’s Australian reporter, covering entertainment, culture, tech, science, and social good. This includes everything from video games and K-pop to movies and gadgets.

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‘The Last of Us’ episode 3: What was at the end of Bill’s letter?

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‘The Last of Us’ episode 3: What was at the end of Bill’s letter?

A bearded man with shoulder-length dark hair sits at a dining table.

Credit: Liane Hentscher/HBO

Well, I think we can all agree that The Last of Us episode 3 ripped out our collective hearts and stomped on them pretty hard, eh?

The 76-minute episode, which tells the story of Bill (Nick Offerman) and Frank (Murray Bartlett), a gay couple who lived for two decades by themselves in a post-pandemic small town outside Boston, is both a moving love story and a pretty hard gut punch, made all the more emotional by the little details sprinkled throughout.

One of the final elements you might have missed near the end of the episode? The ending of Bill’s final letter to Joel (Pedro Pascal), who he’d made reluctant acquaintances with after Frank and Tess (Anna Torv) had covertly become friends over the radio.

Why did Bill leave a letter?

In 2023, the same year Joel, Ellie (Bella Ramsey) and Tess leave their apartment in the Boston quarantine zone to begin their journey into the Massachusetts wilderness, Bill and Frank have reached a tragic point in their decades-long relationship: Frank is terminally ill, presumably with cancer, and one morning he wakes Bill with his decision to make it his final day on Earth. He wants to suit up at their preserved boutique, get married to Bill, and have a final meal of rabbit and Beaujolais red wine — the same meal they shared on the day they first met — before Bill gives him a fatal overdose.

We watch their day play out in deeply moving montage, and everything goes according to Frank’s plan until the very end, when he realises Bill has taken an overdose too.

“This isn’t the tragic suicide at the end of the play,” says Bill. “I’m old. I’m satisfied. And you were my purpose.” The last we see of Bill and Frank is their retreat to the bedroom to die in each other’s arms.

Later, when Joel and Ellie arrive at the now-empty house, they discover that Bill has left a letter on the table, marked: “To whomever, but probably Joel.”

What was at the end of Bill’s letter?

After explaining his and Frank’s fate and mindfully warning people away from the bedroom, Bill’s letter addresses Joel directly. Ellie reads the letter aloud.

“I used to hate the world and I was happy when everyone died,” Bill writes. “But I was wrong. Because there was one person worth saving. That’s what I did: I saved him. And I protected him. That’s why men like you and me are here: We have a job to do. And God help any motherfuckers who stand in our way.

“I leave you all of my weapons and equipment. Use them to keep—”

At this point Ellie abruptly stops reading, anticipating the emotional impact of the end of the sentence, and Joel takes the letter from her to read himself. We see a brief close up, and the words “Tess safe” are clearly visible in Bill’s hand.

Two men stand facing each other outdoors while a large fence is visible in the background, with another man and a woman walking towards its gate.


Credit: Liane Hentscher/HBO

The letter only goes on for a few more lines and Joel’s hands keep us from reading it in full. But we can see “and she decide you’re” on one line, followed by “I recommend pairing” on the penultimate line. On the last line we see a word that looks like a type of wine, possibly “Bordello”.

It’s slight guesswork, but it seems like Bill finished his letter by recommending a food and wine pairing to Joel and Tess, if they decided to stay the night. It’s only a brief moment, but it’s another poignant reminder of the first and the final meals that Bill and Frank shared (“A man who knows to pair rabbit with a Beaujolais” was Frank’s admiring remark on their first meeting). These are the types of finite details that make the show — and episode 3 in particular — so moving.

The Last of Us is now streaming on HBO Max(opens in a new tab) with new episodes airing weekly on Sunday nights at 9 p.m. ET on HBO.

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Sam Haysom is the Deputy UK Editor for Mashable. He covers entertainment and online culture, and writes horror fiction in his spare time.

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The tiny detail in ‘The Last of Us’ episode 3 that explains the show’s first mystery

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The tiny detail in ‘The Last of Us’ episode 3 that explains the show’s first mystery

A man with dark hair and a moustache looks serious.

Credit: Liane Hentscher/HBO

Well, that was a lot.

The Last of Us episode 3 was an emotionally draining experience, with so many moving moments and hidden details that we almost missed one important throwback.

The thing is, though, episode 3 didn’t just serve as a beautiful, contained story that shed more light on the different people surviving in a post-Cordyceps world — it also wrapped up a mystery from episode 1.

What happens in Episode 1?

Towards the end of the show’s first episode, just after Joel (Pedro Pascal) and Tess (Anna Torv) take charge of Ellie (Bella Ramsey) in the Boston quarantine zone, they leave her in their apartment while they discuss what to do in the hallway outside. Ellie overhears them say the names “Bill and Frank” before discovering a radio with a large book of songs sitting next to it. Tucked inside is a sheet of paper with “B/F” written at the top and a brief code scribbled below it that suggests different decades of music mean specific things. ’60s is “nothing in”, ’70s is “new stock”, and ’80s has a red “X” next to it.

The minute Joel comes back into the room, Ellie starts interrogating him.

A teenage girl stands in a dark room looking defiant.

Nothing gets past Ellie.
Credit: Liane Hentscher/HBO

“So, who’s Bill and Frank? The radio’s a smuggling code, right? ’60s songs, we don’t have anything new, ’70s they’ve got new stuff — what’s ’80s?”

Later, after Joel has napped, Ellie tells him, “Oh, the radio came on while you were sleeping. It kept saying like, wake me up before you go, go.'”

“Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” is a Wham! song from 1984. Sure enough, Joel’s reaction — a muttered “shit” — suggests this is bad.

“Gotcha,” Ellie grins. “’80s means trouble. Code broken.”

Later, as Joel, Tess and Ellie make their way through the crumbling outskirts of Boston, we see a shot of their empty apartment as the radio plays Depeche Mode’s 1987 song “Never Let Me Down Again”. Trouble, it would appear, is afoot. But it’s not until the end of episode 3 that we find out exactly what the code means.

What happens in episode 3?

In episode 3, we’re finally introduced to the mysterious Bill (Nick Offerman) and Frank (Murray Bartlett), a gay couple who live alone in a fortified town a little way outside Boston. Joel and Ellie arrive too late, though — by the time they get there, Bill and Frank are both dead, having each taken a fatal overdose in response to Frank’s terminal illness.

And sure enough, while exploring Bill’s extremely well-equipped basement, they come across a radio.

“Why was the music on?” asks Ellie as Joel taps a button to stop it playing.

“If you didn’t reset the countdown every few weeks, this playlist would run over the radio,” he replies.

Ellie looks at the screen and confirms what we’re already thinking: “’80s.”

Joel doesn’t respond directly, but it’s enough to confirm exactly why he muttered “shit” in episode 1 when Ellie tricked him into thinking a Wham! song had played. The radio code wasn’t exactly “trouble” for ’80s, like she guessed — it meant that something had happened to Bill and Frank to stop them from resetting the timer.

For someone as careful as Bill, Joel would have known that likely meant he was captured or dead. And that Depeche Mode song we heard at the end of episode 1? That meant Bill and Frank had likely already been dead for several weeks when Joel, Tess, and Ellie left Boston.

The Last of Us is now streaming on HBO Max(opens in a new tab) with new episodes airing weekly on Sunday nights on HBO.

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Sam Haysom is the Deputy UK Editor for Mashable. He covers entertainment and online culture, and writes horror fiction in his spare time.

By signing up to the Mashable newsletter you agree to receive electronic communications
from Mashable that may sometimes include advertisements or sponsored content.

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